Spring 2023 Courses

Courses in Population Studies

Research Methods in Demography
Subject associations
POP 502 / SOC 532

Source materials used in the study of population; standard procedures for the measurement of fertility, mortality, natural increase, migration, and nuptiality; and uses of model life tables and stable population analysis and other techniques of estimation when faced with inaccurate or incomplete data are studied.

Instructors
Patrick C. Heuveline
Spring 2023
Social Determinants of Health
Subject associations
SPI 565 / SOC 565 / POP 565

Course examines how and why society can make us sick or healthy and how gender, race/ethnicity, wealth, education, occupation and other social statuses shape health outcomes. It looks at the role of social institutions, and environment-society interactions in shaping health outcomes and examines how these factors underlie some of the major causes of illness and death around the world including infant mortality, infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS, and chronic diseases such as heart disease and cancer. The course draws on historical and cross-cultural material from the U.S. as well as global examples from different countries around the world.

Instructors
Sanyu A. Mojola
Spring 2023
Topics in Health: Global Health Challenges
Subject associations
SPI 566A / POP 566

This seminar explores important factors facing the field of global health today, as well as policy actions to address these factors. It examines demographic changes and rapid urbanization, climate change and its implications for global health, the increased importance of non-communicable diseases in low- and middle-income countries, the rise of social media and misinformation/disinformation, new health risk factors such as antimicrobial resistance, and the increased prominence of humanitarian emergencies due to conflicts, natural disasters, pandemics and other disease outbreaks.

Instructors
Alyssa B. Sharkey
Spring 2023

Other Courses of Interest

Responsible Conduct of Research in Economics
Subject associations
ECO 505

This seminar is designed to help graduate students in economics cultivate ethical research practices they may apply in future work at or beyond the University. Students are encouraged to discuss concerns that may arise during the conduct of their research with experienced faculty and devise solutions for dealing with these concerns. The course provides necessary training for newly mandated RCR training for graduate students supported by government grants, and is required for successful completion of the program.

Instructors
Jakub Kastl
Spring 2023
Econometric Theory II
Subject associations
ECO 518

This course begins with extensions of the linear model in several directions: (1) pre-determined but not exogenous regressors; (2) heteroskedasticity and serial correlation; (3) classical GLS; (4) instrumental variables and generalized method of moments estimators. Applications include simultaneous equation models, VARS and panel data. The second part of the course covers the bootstrap, nonparametric estimators, extremum estimators (including discrete choice models), and estimation of treatment effects.

Instructors
Mikkel Plagborg-Moller
Mark W. Watson
Spring 2023
Topics in Labor Economics
Subject associations
ECO 532

The course surveys both the theoretical literature and the relevant empirical methods and results in selected current research topics in labor economics.

Instructors
Leah P. Boustan
Thomas R. Le Barbanchon
Spring 2023
Economic Development II
Subject associations
ECO 563

This course studies topics in Development beyond those covered in ECO 562. Topics vary from year to year. The first half of the course focuses on issues in macro development. Specific topics include an overview of broad development patterns, development accounting, misallocation, structural change, premature deindustrialization, the role of agriculture in development, market imperfections, and risk-sharing. The second half of the course covers micro development. Specific topics include environment, education, gender inequality, intrahousehold allocation, and firms.

Instructors
Seema Jayachandran
Richard Rogerson
Spring 2023
Quantitative Analysis I
Subject associations
POL 572

This is the first class of the quantitative methods field in the PhD. in Politics. It is a doctoral-level introduction to foundations of mathematical statistics for Ph.D. students in Politics and other social and behavioral sciences. The class covers rigorous foundations of classical point estimation and statistical inference, as well foundational topics in econometrics. It covers both finite-sample and large-sample theory and relies on linear algebra and multivariate calculus at the level of POL 502. POL 502 or equivalent is a pre-requisite of this class.

Instructors
Rocío Titiunik
Spring 2023
Techniques and Methods of Social Science
Subject associations
SOC 503

This is a course on research methods for sociology PhD students. The seminar has four objectives: 1) to review foundational principles of research design and contemporary debates in sociological methodology; 2) to introduce students to the practice of different research methods (e.g., survey research, experiments, in-depth interviews, ethnography) while considering the strengths and limitations of various approaches; 3) to familiarize students with the components of a strong empirical paper and prepare them to identify a topic and data for their empirical paper; and 4) to train students in the conduct of responsible research.

Instructors
Kathryn J. Edin
Kristopher Velasco
Spring 2023
Advanced Social Statistics
Subject associations
SOC 504

This course teaches advanced statistical methods for social science in three segments: (1) causal inference, (2) categorical data analysis, and (3) replication analysis. Emphases are on research designs and practical applications rather than statistical theories or computations. Familiarity with basic probability theory, inferential statistics, and linear regression models for continuous dependent variables is assumed.

Instructors
Yu Xie
Spring 2023
Topics in Social Stratification (Half-Term): Systemic Racism
Subject associations
SOC 560

"Systemic racism" highlights structural factors that perpetuate racial inequality despite personal intentions and agency. Sociologists were among the first to identify and theorize the subject. This seminar focuses on sociological contributions to the understanding of systemic racism. First we investigate legislative actions and economic factors perpetuating structural barriers. We then examine migration, immigration, urban development, and residential segregation. Finally, we review resistance movements and policies aimed at addressing systemic racism. The seminar pays attention to Asian American experiences.

Instructors
Patricia Fernández-Kelly
Rhacel Salazar Parreñas
Spring 2023
Econometrics for Policymakers (Advanced)
Subject associations
SPI 508C

The main tools of econometric analysis and the way in which they are applied to a range of problems in social science. The emphasis is on using techniques and understanding and critically assessing others' use of them. There is a great deal of practical work on the computer using a range of data from around the world. Topics include regression analysis, with a focus on regression as a tool for analyzing nonexperimental data and discrete choice. An introduction to time-series analysis is given. There are applications from macroeconomics, policy evaluation, and economic development.

Instructors
Elizabeth Rivera Rodas
Spring 2023
Public Economics and Public Policy
Subject associations
SPI 525

This course covers topics in microeconomic policy analysis. Empirical and theoretical methods are combined to evaluate the impact of public policies on behavior, income distribution, and social welfare. The policies that are covered include welfare programs, minimum wages, tax policy, tax enforcement, parental leave, childcare, social insurance, pensions and savings policy.

Instructors
Henrik J. Kleven
Spring 2023
Urbanization and Development
Subject associations
SPI 540

This course examines the histories, processes and nuanced dynamics that contribute to the making of cities in the Global South. We explore central debates in the study of these cities across geography, urban studies and planning, and development studies. Students deepen their understanding of the Global South, how it is conceptualized and what this means for urban development, while identifying patterns and specificities across the comparative contexts of Africa, Asia and Latin America. Ultimately, we consider how these actors are, or should be considered, in policymaking and planning interventions in the Global South.

Instructors
Devanne E. Brookins
Spring 2023
Topics in Development: Migration Policy
Subject associations
SPI 572A

This course covers the research on the drivers, consequences, and policies of migration. Taking a global and historical perspective, we explore how different factors have become salient in driving migration flows in different parts of the world and at different times and what policies have been implemented and with what consequences. Crucially, we use a broad definition of migration policy, focusing not just on border enforcement or visa regimes, but also on trade, international relations, and social policy which are all linked to human mobility.

Instructors
Filiz Garip
Spring 2023
Politics of Inequality and Redistribution (Half-Term)
Subject associations
SPI 590B / POL 598

The course investigates the interplay of politics and inequality, with a focus on class and race in the United States. The focus is on individuals' political views and behavior, with some attention to political institutions. We take up questions such as: does the political system equally represent the poor, middle class, and rich? Do Americans want government to ameliorate inequality? How do structural factors such as geography affect the politics of racial and ethnic inequality? Why are some people threatened by immigration while others embrace it?

Instructors
Andreas B. Wiedemann
Spring 2023
Sociological Studies of Inequality (Half-Term)
Subject associations
SPI 590C / SOC 571

This segment of the JDP seminar covers theory and research on social stratification, the major subfield in sociology that focuses on inequality. Course begins by reviewing major theories, constructs, measures, and empirical work on inequality. Weeks two through six focus on institutions that are expected to produce (and reproduce) inequalities, including families, neighborhoods, schools, labor markets, and penal policy.

Instructors
Patrick T. Sharkey
Spring 2023
Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term): Affordable Housing
Subject associations
SPI 593O

This seminar explores supply-side approaches to addressing this pervasive housing crisis. We examine critically the current policies, challenges, and practice of developing new, income-restricted affordable housing, both single-family and multi-family, for sale and rental, in the United States. We assess the impacts of building affordable housing on residents and communities, including issues of race and class. We conclude by discussing student papers and assessing likely and desirable alternative future affordable housing policies.

Instructors
David Kinsey
Spring 2023
Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term): Policymaking in Diverse Societies
Subject associations
SPI 593H

This course investigates how ethnic diversity influences policymaking and how state institutions structure ethnic politics; why and how ethnic diversity shapes individuals' and groups' beliefs, preferences, and behaviors in ways that influence the formulation of policy; and also examines sources of inter-group conflict and how policies can help ameliorate or exacerbate such conflict, focusing on immigration policy, multiculturalism, and state institutions that raise or lower the salience of ethnic identity. Topics and readings cover advanced industrialized democracies as well as economically and politically developing countries.

Instructors
Rafaela M. Dancygier
Spring 2023
Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term): Poverty and Social Policy
Subject associations
SPI 594G

Course covers theory and research on social stratification, the major subfield in sociology that focuses on inequality. We begin by reviewing major theories, constructs, and empirical work on inequality. Weeks 2 -6 focus on institutions that mediate the transmission and reproduction of inequality, including families, schools, neighborhoods, labor markets, and the criminal justice system.

Instructors
Kathryn J. Edin
Spring 2023